Egg Freezing and Genetic Legacy

 

The latest New York Times fertility news is about women whose parents help them pay to freeze their eggs.

The article, entitled “So Eager for Grandchildren, They’re Paying for Egg-Freezing,” is a good reminder that infertility affects all generations of a family, but it may also be a woman’s first introduction to the technology.

What the Times article does not mention is that two egg freezing technologies exist–regular cryopreservation and vitrification. The slower freezing method of cryopreservation leads to a survival rate of about 70%, while vitrified embryos have a much higher survival rate—up to 98%.  CCRM is one of only a handful of clinics that vitrify eggs (and embryos).

Even though I know that freezing eggs is medically, ethically, and emotionally complicated, I wish the technology had been available to me in my 20s, and that I had the foresight to use it. I would not have felt a “false sense of security” or chosen to have my family any later in life, as some people fear, but I wouldn’t have felt the same despair at not finding the right person to marry earlier.

If I had a daughter who wanted to preserve her genetics using this technology, I would definitely give her this option, and I would hope she were able to use vitrification at a clinic like CCRM, where her chances of future success would be so much higher.

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2 Responses to Egg Freezing and Genetic Legacy

  1. Pingback: I wish the technology had been available to me in my 20s, and that I had the foresight to use it. | RetrieveFreezeRelax.com

  2. alison says:

    Zahie: so glad to have found your blog. Your thoughtful perspective on these issues is very much appreciated!

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